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The faces of the Libertyville food scene

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Brian Grano (Mickey Finn’s)

“I took over Mickey Finn’s in 2004 and picked up the charter, which was to be a good store to the town, be involved in the community, the local high schools, Carmel and Libertyville, [and] it all just works together.  It’s kinda a symbiotic relationship. I live here, my kids go to Libertyville High School, and we just like to offer a great place for families, and we definitely can.

Justin Synnestvedt (Dairy Dream)

“We’ve got generations of people who come here, multiple generations; kids who came here with their grandparents are adults now and they have their own kids. We had a wedding party here stop by after the wedding all dressed up and everything because it’s a part of their life as well. There’s a woman getting married, who’s lived in Libertyville for the last 25 to 30 years; she’s getting married on May 26 She asked us to do her desserts, so we’re doing ice cream sandwiches for her wedding. My family bought this store in 2007 and it’s just cool to come into a business that has such deep roots that you get to see people grow up. It’s cool to grow older with the community and know that it’s important in some small way in their lives.”

John Durning (Pizzeria Deville)

“[Pizzeria Deville has] kept me in business. The community is very giving and supportive of businesses and so that’s been great. We are involved in a lot of different charities. Most of it is hyperlocal and it effects homeless people that we know in town by name; it’s very tangible to the staff and to me and so in that way, it’s been awesome. It’s brought us together and continues to. It’s been good to the town; it’s been great for us. Our role in the community is to make our community better and as a result, the community’s gonna help make us better too.”

 

 

 

Christine Karahalios (Townee)

“The Townee does more than just sell food.  It helps people connect with the Libertyville community.  We have been truly honored to serve the food we love, in the town we love, to the people we love. We have so many great memories of so many wonderful people, including many who have left us for their next life.  All of that has made this journey so incredibly special for us. For many, the Townee is a home away from home. That’s why coming to the Townee is not a job for me. It’s a chance to come and spend time with my dearest      friends, every day.”

 

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The student news publication of Libertyville High School
The faces of the Libertyville food scene